A 5.5-MW GHP system; Investors’ climate change risk

SouthCliffe, Washington State, will soon have the nation’s largest geothermal neighborhood. In the investment world, groups say climate change remains a material risk.

Geothermal Neighborhood in Washington State May Be Nation’s Largest
Report Says Investors See Climate Change as Risk That Influences Decisions

Geothermal Neighborhood in Washington State May Be Nation’s Largest
By Sustainable Energy Coalition/SUN DAY Campaign, source: Tri-City Herald — Once all 400 lots at SouthCliffe are filled with homes, the Southridge housing development will be the nation’s largest geothermal neighborhood. EnerGeo of Richland already is installing a geothermal heat pump system for the first 18 lots of the subdivision. Once finished, the geothermal grids will have a thermal energy capacity of more than 5.5 megawatts. The full project is expected to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by more than 10,000 metric tons each year.

Report Says Investors See Climate Change as Risk That Influences Decisions
By Sustainable Energy Coalition/SUN DAY Campaign, source: Bloomberg.com — According to the third annual “Global Investor Survey on Climate Change” released by a coalition of global investor groups, climate change remains a material risk for a majority of investors and, in many cases, it is increasingly influencing their investment activities. About 81 percent of asset owners and 68 percent of asset managers said they view climate change as a material risk across their entire investment portfolio. Most of the remaining respondents identified climate risks only for certain asset classes, such as real estate and infrastructure. Climate change also had an impact on investment activities in 2012, with more than half of asset managers and almost a quarter of asset owners saying climate change concerns influenced their investment or divestment decisions. The report, based on survey responses from 84 investors representing more than $14 trillion in assets, was released by the Global Investor Coalition on Climate Change.

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