Online resource map; Hungary sites; UK research

The EU’s GEOELEC map covers the 28 European Union members plus Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, and Turkey. Hungary is opening potential development sites. British Universities partner with the BGS on geothermal.

Online Tool Shows Geothermal Resource Assessments in Europe
Hungary: Development Ministry Opens Geothermal Concessions
UK: Research Group Studies Geothermal Potential

Online Tool Shows Geothermal Resource Assessments in Europe
An online tool called GEOELEC Geographical Information System is a map showing known geothermal resource assessment data from 1km to 5km depth. This is the first of its kind for the EU-28 Member States, plus Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, and Turkey. The project was co-funded by the Intelligent Energy Europe Programme of the EU. The data is explained at: Geoelec.eu. See the GIS map: Test.thermogis.nl

Hungary: Development Ministry Opens Geothermal Concessions
The National Development Ministry this week announced tenders for geothermal energy, along with hydrocarbon mining concessions. The geothermal energy concessions are for a period of 35 years, and are located in Jászberény, Ferencszállás and Kecskemét. The Ministry has previously stated goals diversify energy resources and secure local supply.

The country also seeks to strengthen its mining industry. “Use of our hydrocarbon reserves and geothermal potential can significantly improve Hungary’s security of supply in the long term and substantially reduce its dependence on imports,” Climate and Energy Affairs Minister Pál Kovács was quoted in local press. Bbj.hu

UK: Research Group Studies Geothermal Potential
A research collaboration in UK with initial partners University of Glasgow, the British Geological Survey, the University of Durham, and the University of Newcastle aims to support technical collaboration and improve geothermal exploitation in the country. The group, called “BritGeothermal,” has collaborated on geothermal boreholes at Eastgate, County Durham, and central Newcastle, and the group’s work also extends to India and Kenya.

BritGeothermal Research Manager Charlotte Adams wrote at The Conversation: “With the potential to provide a massive 100 GW of heat, this could theoretically satisfy the entire space heating demand in the UK, saving carbon dioxide emissions of around 120 million tones.”

The group is studying potential use of hot water by-products from oil extraction; geothermal potential at geological faults and sedimentary basins at several locations; and potential for heating systems within abandoned mineworkings. Bgs.ac.uk

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