Djibouti developing at Lake Assal; Icelandic company to develop in Ethiopia; A Tanzanian update

Djibouti’s geothermal development at Lake Assal moves forward. Reykjavik Geothermal has agreed to develop as much as 1,000 megawatts of projects in Ethiopia. Various aspects of geotheraml development in Tanzania are pointing to positive signs for the industry there.


Djibouti: Geothermal Generation Expected Within Five Years
Ethiopia: Reykjavik Geothermal Agrees to Develop in Ethiopia
Tanzania: Geothermal Rising in Investment and Project Planning

Djibouti: Geothermal Generation Expected Within Five Years
Djibouti’s geothermal development is moving forward, as shared on Scidev.net: “Power generation in Lake Assal is expected to start in 2018 at a cost of US$240 million, generating 40 to 60 megawatts. AfDB is recommending that public-private partnerships develop these power projects.” The article quotes Frank Wouters, IRENA deputy director-general: “African countries in the Great Rift Valley possess substantial, largely untapped geothermal resources which can generate electricity reliably and at a low cost, as Kenya is already doing.”

Ethiopia: Reykjavik Geothermal Agrees to Develop in Ethiopia
Reykjavik Geothermal has agreed to develop as much as 1,000 megawatts of projects in Ethiopia over the next 10 years and expects to spend a total of $4 billion. Test drilling will begin early next year, with generation schedule looking at 10 megawatts by 2015, and possibly a second phase. Ethiopian Electric Power Corp. will buy all the electricity under a 25-year contract.

Tanzania: Geothermal Rising in Investment and Project Planning
Geothermal potential in Tanzania looks promising. The African Development Bank (AfDB) is allotting $25 million in its investment plan; GEA member Ormat Technologies is involved in an agreement with Symbion; and Geothermal Power Tanzania expects to reach 140 MW by 2018 in the south of the country:

AfDB’s Tanzania investment plan has approved $50 million of funding for solar and geothermal investment in the African country. The $25 million geothermal part of the plan encourages 100 MW of geothermal development through SREP funding – ADB/CIF’s Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program for low-income countries. Pv-magazine.com

Over the summer, Symbion, a founding partner of the U.S. Power Africa initiative signed a new agreement for geothermal power in Tanzania with equipment and expertise through GEA member Ormat Technologies.

GEA’s September 2013 International Project List, PDF shows three potential geothermal fields under some stage in early development by Geothermal Power Tanzania Ltd. projections show an investment of $350 million to drill steam fields in the Southern region of Tanzania in order to reach 140 MW by 2018.

Tanzania has also offered interest in foreign investment through: trade liberalization, financial sector reform, privatization, and special tax incentives.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s