Alaskan Senator; California’s Imperial County; California lithium carbonate plant; Idaho group supports RE & EE; Minnesota’s Carbon Dioxide Plume Geothermal; Montana geothermal lands; North Carolina direct use; Ohio college to get geo system

In the United States, an Alaskan Senator supports geothermal investment. California’s Imperial County conducts public outreach for renewable projects, while a California company begins construction on the first commercial lithium carbonate from geothermal plant. A Minnesota startup targets Carbon Dioxide Plume Geothermal. Montana legislation would withdraw potential geothermal lands. In North Carolina, a direct use project uses geothermal for agriculture. In Ohio, Antioch College is going geothermal.


Alaska: Senator Supports Geothermal Investment
California: Imperial County to Conduct Public Outreach on Renewable Project Decisions
California: First Commercial Lithium Carbonate from Geothermal Plant to Begin Construction
Idaho: State Group Supports Clean Energy Business
Minnesota: University Startup to Begin First Application of Carbon Dioxide Plume Geothermal
Montana: Legislation would Withdraw Potential Geothermal Lands
North Carolina: Geothermal Direct Use Project to Work with Area Growers
Ohio: Antioch College to Get Geothermal Heating System

Alaska: Senator Supports Geothermal Investment
Alaskan Senator Mark Begich (D) told press recently that state investment in renewables like geothermal will help Alaska become the leader in U.S. renewable development as it faces its unique threats from climate change. The senator was quoted on Adn.com that the state plans to surpass other states by investing in wind, geothermal and solar power, reaching 50% renewables in its energy mix by 2025. This year renewables make up 27% of state energy.

California: Imperial County to Conduct Public Outreach on Renewable Project Decisions
The Imperial County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to approve funding that will go to complete the general plan update, which includes a geothermal/alternative energy and transmission element. Among the outcomes, the update will look at ideal places for renewable energy projects, with particular focus on the Salton Sea area where geothermal projects are located. Brian Mooney, Chambers Group director of environmental and urban planning said, “One key thing is to make the element work with other elements.” He added that the next step is to conduct public outreach workshops: “We want to take an inventory of all the issues in the area by creating a public outreach program,” Mooney said. Ivpressonline.com

California: First Commercial Lithium Carbonate from Geothermal Plant to Begin Construction
California-based Simbol Inc. is the first in producing near-100% pure lithium carbonate using geothermal brine and now plans to begin building the first commercial plant by the end of the fiscal year. The expected annual production capacity is 15,000 tons. A press release from investor Itochu Corp. (Ajw.asahi.com) states, “The unique production technology developed by Simbol limits the emissions of carbon dioxide and reduces energy costs without being affected by changes in weather conditions as it does not involve solar evaporation.” Currently, ~70% of global lithium chemicals production is done through solar evaporation at salt lakes in South America, the release said.

Idaho: State Group Supports Clean Energy Business
A group formed last year, the Idaho Clean Energy Association, represents renewable energy and efficiency firms in the state and seeks to show that their clean energy solutions will strengthen the state’s energy security from home. Idahostatesman.com describes how the group formed partially as a response to an anti-wind campaign from Idaho Power. Geothermal power producer and GEA member U.S. Geothermal is based in Boise, is part of the Idaho Clean Energy Association, and has a good relationship with Idaho Power. Ian Warren, a U.S. Geothermal geologist who is on the Idaho Clean Energy Association Board was quoted: “It’s about economics, it’s about jobs and it’s about resources in the state of Idaho.”

Minnesota: University Startup to Begin First Application of Carbon Dioxide Plume Geothermal
Finance-commerce.com reports that a University of Minnesota startup is looking to the coming year to begin work on a pilot plant that could be the first commercial application of Carbon Dioxide Plume Geothermal, which uses carbon dioxide heated geothermally. “It would be the first of a kind but the opportunity to do that exists on an extremely broad basis there,” Ken Carpenter, Heat Mining Co. managing director, told press.

Montana: Legislation would Withdraw Potential Geothermal Lands
A bill that is gaining attention and support from Montana sportsmen for preserving lands for hunting and fishing would at the same time withdraw lands from potential geothermal use. The North Fork Watershed Protection Act would withdraw specific lands within the North Fork of the Flathead River Valley from future geothermal development. Ammoland.com

North Carolina: Geothermal Direct Use Project to Work with Area Growers
A research project at Haywood Community College, Clyde, N.C. has received a North Carolina Department of Agriculture $50,000 grant to pre-cool fresh produce using geothermal energy. The project team is looking to demonstrate the durability and low maintenance of geothermal systems and to work with area growers. Thepacker.com

Ohio: Antioch College to Get Geothermal Heating System
Antioch College is planning for a geothermal heating and cooling plant on campus and has secured building permits from Greene County. Antioch has previously in 2010 drilled a 300-foot well to determine project feasibility. Bizjournals.com

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