California law; A minerals extraction expert looks at geothermal brine; Texas geothermal coproduction

In U.S. states, a California statute regulates hydraulic fracturing. In Texas, geothermal coproduction is still a developing market.

California: New Statute Regulates Hydraulic Fracturing
California: Mineral Extraction Expert Joins Company Producing Lithium from Geothermal
Texas: Geothermal Coproduction Seeing Fewer Requests, but Market Potential Still Strong

California: New Statute Regulates Hydraulic Fracturing
California’s new, comprehensive statute to regulate the hydraulic fracturing industry is making headlines. Lexology.com notes, “many of the details in California are not yet known, and this makes the forthcoming regulations critical. The Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources at California’s Department of Conservation will be promulgating regulations, the scope of which will include well stimulation, construction and maintenance, and permitting requirements. The State Water Resources Control Board will be setting forth groundwater monitoring criteria specific to fracking. The statute requires both of these sets of regulations to be finalized by January 1, 2015.”

California: Mineral Extraction Expert Joins Company Producing Lithium from Geothermal
Dr. John Burba, an expert in lithium and other mineral extraction technologies, is joining an innovative geothermal company in California as President and CEO. Simbol Materials uses geothermal brine from Imperial Valley plants to produce lithium and other specialty materials. “I am excited about Simbol’s future. This company has the potential to transform the production of lithium and other high value specialty materials,” Burba told press (Fortmilltimes.com). His experience includes Molycorp, FMC, Dow and Chevron.

Texas: Geothermal Coproduction Seeing Fewer Requests, but Market Potential Still Strong
An article on Stateimpact.npr.org explores geothermal coproduction with oil and gas wells in Texas. At one point, geothermal energy developers had taken out nine leases for wells on state land, Texas General Land Office spokesperson Jim Suydam was quoted. “In 2005 there was a great deal of interest in Texas geothermal. Since then there’s been a glut of natural gas on the market due to the advances of hydraulic fracturing. And that’s lowered the price of natural gas substantially and has made geothermal energy production less economically viable.” Despite lowered interested, Gulf Coast Green Energy CEO Loy Sneary, who has spoken about his company’s geothermal work at Geothermal Energy Association events, was quoted: “The market I think is huge for this because the fact is, there are over 800,000 oil & gas wells in the United States. And there’s three million gallons per minute of hot water just in the top eight states.” Sneary said, “It’s going back into the earth but there’s no beneficial use for that hot water. It’s an expense to the company. In fact, produced water is a very high expense for oil and gas companies.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s