GEA members in the news: Cyrq Energy, ElectraTherm, Enel Green Power, Gradient Resources, and US Geothermal

Geothermal Energy Association members bring you new geothermal power plants on line in the U.S. and developments around the Americas.

Cyrq Energy: New Mexico Gets Its First Geothermal Commercial Power
ElectraTherm: New Waste Heat to Power Generator Features Higher Output
Enel Green Power: MOU Indicates Geothermal Cooperation in Mexico
Gradient Resources: Patua Project in Nevada Supplies Power to the Grid
US Geothermal: Operations and Development Updated for Oregon, Nevada, Idaho, and Guatemala Assets

Cyrq Energy: New Mexico Gets Its First Geothermal Commercial Power
Cyrq Energy has brought the first commercial geothermal power in New Mexico on line through its 4-MW Lightning Dock power plant. Production began on December 24, local press noted, and is slated for Public Service Company of New Mexico. Cyrq pumps 300-degree hot water from 1,200 feet to 3,000 feet below ground at flow rates near 2,200 gallons per minute. The same site had housed geothermal agriculture and fish farming in the past.

ElectraTherm: New Waste Heat to Power Generator Features Higher Output
ElectraTherm Press Release (RENO, NV) January 14 ~ The Green Machine 4020 Produces Emission-Free Power up to 110kWe ~ ElectraTherm, a leader in distributed power generation from waste heat, announces its higher output heat to power generator, the Green Machine 4020. The 4020 is ElectraTherm’s largest output machine, producing up to 110kWe of fuel-free, emission-free electricity utilizing ElectraTherm’s proven Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) technology. ElectraTherm leads the market in small-scale ORC technology with more than 145,000 hours of fleet run time, and the Green Machine is the only ORC with ElectraTherm’s patented twin screw expander technology suitable for lower grade waste heat streams and able to run with multiphase flows.

ElectraTherm’s 4020 model accepts higher input flows and as an added benefit the machine can run in Combined Heat and Power (CHP) mode where exit condensing temperatures are sufficient to feed district heating systems or industrial processes. The Green Machine 4020 pairs especially well with larger reciprocating engines sized greater than 800kW to increase both power output and efficiency, and opens new market opportunities in natural gas compression & processing as well as prime power.
Hot water enters the Green Machine 4020 between 77-116°C (170-240°F) and flow rates between 6.4-22.1 l/s (100-350 gpm), where it heats a working fluid into pressurized vapor. As the vapor expands, it drives ElectraTherm’s patented twin screw power block, which spins an electric generator and produces up to 110kWe. ORC condensing heat can be further utilized to supply 50-55°C water to local heating loads.

The Green Machine 4020 comes available in three configurations to meet individual customer needs. The configurations start with a standalone Green Machine ORC at 2.4 x 1.8 x 2.2 meters for the smallest footprint, ideal for easy integration on either indoor or outdoor installations. The second configuration comes in a 20-foot ISO frame for ease of installation and multiple condensing options. Lastly, the turnkey package is available for plug and play installation and includes a liquid loop radiator, all piping/pumps and minimal engineering in a 40-foot ISO frame. See product details and available configurations here.

The Green Machine 4020 joins ElectraTherm’s initial Series 4000 product, the Green Machine 4010, which offers outputs up to 65kWe and is sized for lower flow waste heat availability. ElectraTherm’s heat to power generators utilize waste heat on applications such as internal combustion engines, biomass, geothermal/co-produced fluids and solar thermal. The Green Machine fleet spans the globe with 26 installed machines and greater than 95% availability.

Enel Green Power: New Agreement Indicates Geothermal Cooperation in Mexico
In early January 2014, Enel Green Power concluded an agreement for a 5-year, US$150 million loan from Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria Bancomer (Mexico) to partially cover its investment plan in Mexico. (This is in addition to a similar agreement with the bank’s Chile unit). Although Enel does not have current geothermal power online in Mexico, CEO Fulvio Conti and José Luis Fernàndez Zayas, Executive Director of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas, signed a Memorandum of Understanding on January 13 toward cooperation in geothermal energy and smart grids. “We are very pleased with this agreement” Conti was quoted by press, “through which we can share with the Mexican government our undisputed know-how in these two areas. Enel has over a century of experience in the geothermal industry and is running projects with this clean resource in many countries.”

Gradient Resources: Patua Project in Nevada Supplies Power to the Grid
An announcement on the company Web site states: “Gradient Resources is pleased to announce the initial phase of the Patua Geothermal Project, located near Fernley, NV has achieved commercial operations!” The Geothermal Energy Association congratulates the success. The notice states, “The Patua Project initial phase is expected to power 15,000 homes annually. This facility represents a significant investment in the state of Nevada and will provide meaningful long term employment for the approximately 20, full-time plant staff, and employees of the local businesses who provide support to the operations.”

US Geothermal: Operations and Development Updated for Oregon, Nevada, Idaho, and Guatemala Assets
US Geothermal Press Release (BOISE, IDAHO) January 13–US Geothermal Inc. (TSX:GTH)(NYSE MKT:HTM), a leading renewable energy company focused on the development, production and sale of electricity from geothermal energy, provides this update on the results of its three operating projects for the fourth quarter of 2013, and status of development activities.

OPERATIONS
Neal Hot Springs, Oregon
All three units have been and are operating smoothly, with fourth quarter availability of 94.7%. December generation averaged 27.7 net megawatts per hour for all hours the plant was in service. Total generation for the fourth quarter was 53,550 megawatt-hours, which is a result of excellent availability and low seasonal temperatures. This compares to 25,836 megawatt-hours for the third quarter, 30,015 for the second quarter, and 46,159 for the first quarter. Under the terms of our Power Purchase Agreement (“PPA”), November and December generation for 2013 was paid at a seasonally adjusted price of $118.80 per megawatt-hour, which is 120% of the 2013 average contract price, while October was paid at the average 2013 contract price of $99.00. For 2014, the average contract price will increase from $99.00 to $102.78 per megawatt-hour.

San Emidio, Nevada
The plant performance was exceptional, with fourth quarter availability of 98.3%. December generation averaged 9.96 net megawatts per hour for all hours the unit was in service. Total generation for the fourth quarter was 21,103 megawatt hours. This compares to 18,318 megawatt-hours for the third quarter, 18,039 for the second quarter, and 19,157 for the first quarter. Under the terms of our PPA, generation during the quarter was paid at the price of $90.27 per megawatt-hour. There is no seasonal adjustment under this power purchase agreement. For 2014, the contract price will increase from $90.27 to $91.17 per megawatt-hour.

Raft River, Idaho
The plant performance was exceptional, with fourth quarter availability of 99.2%. December generation averaged 10.2 net megawatts per hour for all hours the plant was in service. Total generation for the fourth quarter was 21,742 megawatt-hours, as a result of excellent availability and low seasonal temperatures. This compares to 18,688 megawatt-hours for the third quarter, 17,247 for the second quarter, and 19,670 for the first quarter. Under the terms of our PPA, November and December generation for 2013 was paid at a seasonally adjusted price of $71.36 per megawatt-hour, which is 120% of the 2013 average contract price, while October was paid at the 2013 average contract price of $59.47. For 2014, the average contract price will increase from $59.47 to $60.72 per megawatt-hour. In addition to the price paid for energy, Raft River currently receives $4.75 per megawatt-hour under a separate contract for the sale of Renewable Energy Credits.

“Our operating team has done an outstanding job this past quarter, particularly considering the unseasonably cold weather that each of our plants experienced during November and December. Our units are all performing with high availabilities, and with output that is at or above what we had expected,” said Dennis Gilles, Chief Executive Officer of US Geothermal. “As a result of this strong fourth quarter, we anticipate our year end to be well within the range of guidance provided earlier, and we look forward to excellent results for the coming year.”

DEVELOPMENT
El Ceibillo, Guatemala
Evaluation and testing of well EC-1, which found a higher than anticipated resource temperature of 526degF (274degC), was completed. Based on the results of EC-1, a second round of drilling was planned, and on January 9(th) drilling began on a series of eight to ten 650 foot (200 meter) gradient wells that will be used to further map the underlying geothermal resource and assist with identifying future drilling targets. This second round drilling program is expected to continue over the next three to four months.

San Emidio, Nevada
We have also completed our evaluation and testing of wells OW-12 and OW-10, and we have applied for and are waiting on the issuance of drilling permits from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) before drilling additional wells to further define the resource. Additionally, a detailed development schedule for the Phase II project was submitted to NV Energy, our power off-taker, and we are awaiting their approval.

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