International roundup: Geothermal in Canada, The Philippines, Finland, Hungary, and more

This post brings you geothermal news from Hawaii, Canada, The Philippines, Finland, Hungary, and Turkey.

Geothermal photos via Twitter users @NevGOE in Nevada and @L_Faye in Iceland
Geothermal photos via Twitter users @NevGOE in Nevada and @L_Faye in Iceland

Click below to read this week’s international geothermal roundup.

U.S. States

*Hawaii: Utility Acquired for $4.3 Billion
NextEra Energy, which owns and operates U.S. wind, solar, and nuclear power has acquired Hawaiian Electric Industries at a value of $4.3 billion. The arrangement will help HEI increase its renewables capacity and Hawaii’s role as a model for new energy models incorporating renewables on a high scale and solving related issues that arise. [GreenTechMedia.com, utilitydive.com]

The Americas

*Canada: Estevan Could be Flagship for Canadian Geothermal
DEEP Earth CEO Kirsten Marcia says the company’s project near Estevan in in Saskatchewan, Canada, can serve as the flagship for geothermal in Canada. “As soon as you’ve got discounted heat, you’ve got a number of opportunities,” she said. “The add-on opportunities cannot be overlooked. If we divert just 40 per cent of our outtake water before it’s re-injected into the ground, we can heat a 20-acre greenhouse for free. It’s just wastewater,” said Marcia in a presentation to the City Council. [estevanmercury.ca]

*Canada: Geothermal a Better Choice than Site C Dam
The Canadian Geothermal Energy Association (CanGEA) has released a report titled “Geothermal: The Renewable and Cost Effective Alternative to Site C.” Site C refers to the proposed $8 billion Site C dam project for British Columbia. Key advantages that geothermal has over Site C include lower unit cost and capital cost, avoided transmission upgrades, ancillary services and heat as a byproduct, and more. Read the report at cangea.ca [PDF].

Asia and the Pacific

*The Philippines: DOE to Offer Four Geothermal Sites
The Philippines Department of Energy plans to launch four geothermal tenders on December 15, though the offer was said to be dependent on successful stakeholders consultations that are happening this week. The four geothermal areas are: Amakan in Mindanao; Balut Island, also in Mindanao; Cabalian in Southern Leyte; and Acupan-Itogon in Northern Luzon. [mb.com.ph]

*The Philippines: EDC Adds 5 MW Capacity
Energy Development Corp has added 5 MW of geothermal power to its Bac-Man Unit 2 geothermal facility for a total of 60 MW gross. The company expects the plant to be running at full generating capacity by the time the increased power supply will be crucial in summer 2015. [gmanetwork.com]

Europe

*Finland: Geothermal to Heat Espoo
Finland is planning to build a geothermal power plant facility that will provide district heating for Espoo, its second largest city. Finnish energy companies Fortum and St1 estimate they can provide up to 40 MW of geothermal heat, and are looking to reduce emissions. Construction is targeted for 2016. [energylivenews.com]

*Hungary: Project Near Battonya Planned for 2018
Hungarian company EU-FIRE along with Mannvit of Iceland are planning to open a geothermal facility near Battonya, Hungary, by the end of 2018. The project is estimated at €116 million cost and has received a €39.3 million European Union grant. The companies estimate it will generate 12 MW of electricity and 60 MW of heat energy annually. [bbj.hu]

*Turkey: Manisa-Alasehir Facility to Open Next Year
Zorlu Energy is constructing the first geothermal power plant in the Manisa-Alasehir region and plans to begin commercial operation in October 2015. Zorlu has chosen Metso company to provide flow control technology. “The benefits of Metso’s flow control technology in extracting geothermal energy include high performance, availability and capacity as well as a minimal maintenance need and environmental friendliness. We will also support the customer with life-cycle services,” Metso rep Cansu Gürbüz told press. [globenewswire.com]

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